Happy Hour Bingo!

Pabst Blue Ribbon Presents

Happy Hour Bingo!

Social Distortion, Clean Bandit, Colony House

Thursday, 3/23

Doors: 4:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$0.00

Free

This event is 21 and over

WIN TIX TO: Social Distortion, Rainbow Kitten Surprise, Chicano Batman, Clean Bandit, Of Montreal, Betty Who, Colony House, Wood + Wire, Lil Smokies

No ticket necessary. Bring a valid ID.

Social Distortion
Social Distortion
Here's how you know you've made it in the music business: You've stayed strong for three decades on your own terms, on your own time, by your own rules, and over that time your influence has only grown. Each of your albums has been stronger than your last. You've been brought onstage by Bruce Springsteen, because he wanted to play one of your songs. You've seen high times and low ones, good days and tragic days, but every night you give 100%, and every morning you wake up still swinging.

This is the short version of the Social Distortion bio -- the long version could be a 10-part mini-series. But over the past 30 years, the punk godfathers in the band have all but trademarked their sound, a brand of hard rockabilly/punk that's cut with the melodic, road-tested lyrics of frontman Mike Ness. Their searing guitars and a locomotive rhythm section sound as alive today as they did in '82, as do Ness' hard-luck tales of love, loss and lessons learned. "The most common thing I hear is, 'Man, your music got me through some hard times,'" Ness says. "And I just say, 'Me too.'"
Clean Bandit
What does deep house, the work of Stockhausen, a self-programmed snake and a frozen Lily Cole have in common? No, it's not the contents of a lost episode of Skins. Nor is it the XX's Christmas list. It is, rather, just a few of the details that make up Clean Bandit, a new four-piece that in their playfulness and willingness to trample over musical boundaries offer a refreshing new direction for dance music in 2013.

Forget your rock revivalists or your retrofitted soul crooners, Clean Bandit could not have emerged at any time other than now. Comprised of brothers Jack and Luke Patterson alongside the classically-trained pair of Grace Chatto and Neil Amin-Smith, the group formed in 2008. One night , in the dingy confines of a Cambridge nightclub, classic music met bass music, and it never looked back.

"It was at the band's own club night called National Rail Disco. We set it up because we thought there was a real lack of new interesting music at the time. The first ever one was basically set up so we could perform. But as it carried on it became more of a straightforward club night we DJ'd or played live most weeks alongside other DJs and electronic acts we loved."

The students, not normally thought to be a particularly clubby kind of crowd, were into it. "They loved it, it was really successful and always completely packed", says Jack. "People didn't expect the students to be into it, but they were. They all had a real appetite for the music. One of the coolest things was the night we had James Blake down. Three quarters of the way through his set he just played a Destiny's Child acapella on its own. Even though there was no beat,. people just went completely off. That was amazing."

National Rail Disco provided Clean Bandit with a blueprint for everything that was to follow. First, there was a willingness to take risks. Second a desire to blend beats and strings. Third, it was done in a DIY fashion, using whatever resources were to hand.

But first they decided to move to Moscow. Grace to learn the language and play cello. Jack followed her, and ended up enrolling in Russia's famous film school, The Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography. "I didn't have much to do in Moscow and someone mentioned a film course that was open to international students so I thought I'd give it a try. It was a five year course," Jack recalls. "I didn't do the whole thing, but the whole of the first year you only do black and white still images. In the second year you do moving images but still only in black and white. It was all in Russian too, and to begin with none of the students spoke a word of it."

It was at the Gerasimov that Jack's ideas of blending music recordings with filmmaking began to take shape. "I was making music on a laptop a lot while I was there", he says. "It was still a hobby though. I had long days at film school and then would come home and have a go messing around making music. I wrote Mozart's House while I was out there. I was listening to a lot of house music there, there was a little boutique outside our flat that would blast out house for 24 hours. Maybe that seeped in."

Now, in 2013, Clean Bandit are still mixing things up. Currently residing in London, this electroquartet are applying their principles to a whole new range of possibilities. Listen to single 'A&E' and you'll hear classical, bucolic strings intertwining with UK funky bass and a melody of modern electronic pop. It's a new sophisticated sound, but one that's distinctive of our capital. The soulful vocals, meanwhile, are sung by guests Kandaka Moore and Nikki Marshall, found by chance in the group's new home of Kilburn. "They were part of local community singing and dancing group next door to our studio", says Jack. "We thought they would be perfect for this track." And so they are, sharing the enthusiasm of the track and, also, the versatility of the group. Moore also volunteered as a dancer for the video, which necessitated her being part of a stop-motion animation. "She was completely unfazed by being painted gold over the course of two hours", notes Jack.

That was far from being the most complicated part of the production, by the way. The video for A&E also required the creation of a golden snake. A serpent that, as in a real life game of Snake, slithered across central London. It was a challenge, one that Jack -- typically -- took it upon himself to rise to. So how do you make a snake? "We made it on the computer", he says. "I taught myself to use Cinema 4D. I studied architecture at uni, so I had kind of got into 3d graphics, modeling and animation. Luke learned how to do the fluid dynamics, because the snake had to go through water at the beginning."

Clean Bandit have also been getting a taste of a different experience closer to home whilst on tour this spring with teenage chart conquerors Disclosure. "The tour was really fun", says Jack. "It was great to see how that world worked and to be in these really cool clubs up and down the country was brilliant. There were screaming fans. We had people who knew the words to our songs, which was quite amazing to see. It was unexpected."

The stakes were raised even higher for new single 'Dust Clears'. This concept video, also directed by Jack, was half-filmed on the frozen lakes of northern Sweden in winter. "In this video all the band work in a factory, but the lead singer is an older guy who's got this fantasy of being an ice skater", says Jack, with a smile. "We filmed the skating in Sweden and that was great, we used some special techniques. Two of us were towed along on a sled with two different lenses, two cameras filming our dear friend Nick as he skated past. Nick is our friend's dad and while we were thinking about making the video we heard that when he was 17 he was a Scottish figure skating champion. When you see the video, you'll see why we found this quite amazing."

Quite clearly kids of the internet generation, Clean Bandit aren't precious about where they find inspiration or how they deploy it (the aforementioned Lily Cole volunteered to stand in a freezing cold swimming pool for the video to UK Shanty, in return for Jack giving her a tutorial on her new video camera). Neither are they devoted to one type of creativity. They make music, they make video, they perform live.

"We try to think of each piece as being a music video rather than a song", says Jack. "Videos for songs is the output. That's how we'd like it to be digested. Now we're doing more and more music, we're having to make stuff without the videos, but hopefully we'll be able to catch up."
Colony House
In a relatively brief span of time, Colony House has emerged as a vibrant creative force, as well as a beloved fan favorite with a passionate, fiercely loyal fan base. That audience is likely to expand substantially with the release of When I Was Younger, the Nashville, TN trio's first full-length album, whose 14 compelling original tunes fulfill the abundant promise of the band's three widely-acclaimed, self-released EPs.

It's not surprising that Colony House has struck a resonant chord with listeners. The threesome maintains a balance of craft and immediacy that reflects its affinity for the sound of such alt-rock outfits as Interpol and The Killers, while echoing the influence of such alternative icons as U2 and New Order. They've assimilated their multiple influences in a manner that's wholly distinctive, adding tight harmonies, strong instrumental chops and a keen melodic sensibility that's all their own.

Lead singer, guitarist and principal songwriter Caleb Chapman writes effortlessly infectious tunes that resonate with personal experience and emotional authority. The songs' messages of faith, hope and perseverance are matched by the organic musical rapport of Caleb and his bandmates, brother Will Chapman on drums and Scott Mills on lead guitar and harmony vocals.

"The songs I write have always come from deep places, whether they're deep places of joy or deep places of hurt, and it can be hard inviting people into those places with you," Caleb states.

That openhearted attitude is reflected throughout When I Was Younger, both in Caleb's expressive vocals and in the band's vivid performances of such personally-charged tunes as "Silhouettes," "Second Guessing Games," "Keep On Keeping On," "Waiting for My Time to Come" and "Won't Give Up," which exemplify the combination of sharp lyrical insight and indelible melodic craft that makes Colony House special.

As When I Was Younger demonstrates, much of Colony House's appeal lies in the three bandmates' powerful rapport, which extends into every aspect of their lives—and which has defined their approach towards the music.

"Our musical and personal chemistry goes hand in hand," Caleb affirms. "The three of us are best friends, which means that at any given moment we are each other's worst enemies as well. Being in a band is like being in a marriage—it's a constant reminder of your own pride, and a reminder that you have to be willing to sacrifice in order for it to be successful. We've made a conscious effort to build the foundation of the band on our friendship, and then letting that spill over into our creative relationship."

As the sons of Contemporary Christian pop superstar Steven Curtis Chapman, Caleb and Will Chapman have been steeped in music for their entire lives. They began making music together in early childhood, playing with their dad as well as their own combos. In 2009 they joined forces with Scott Mills, who they'd met through a cousin. Although initially known collectively as Caleb, the trio rechristened themselves Colony House in 2013, borrowing the name of an apartment complex in their hometown of Franklin, where Will and Scott as well as Caleb's future wife had all lived prior to the band's formation.

The new combo quickly began to win attention, bringing its charismatic live shows to fans via diligent touring, while earning critical raves with a series of acclaimed EPs: Colony House, Trouble and To the Ends of the World. Along the way, the band members found time to pursue other musical adventures, with Caleb collaborating with Will's wife, singer Jillian Edwards, as the In-Laws, and Will moonlighting playing drums on tour with noted indie combo Ivan and Alyosha.

But Colony House remains the focus of their musical lives, as When I Was Younger makes clear. "We labored on the album for a long time," Caleb notes. "We began recording it in September 2012 and finished it in July 2013. We had our dear friends Joe Causey and Ben Shive co-produce it, which made it a very special experience. They knew that this was our first full-length project, and I think that they felt the responsibility to help us tell our story the right way.

"Creating this record had such a strong set of contrasting emotions: joy, hope, frustration, sorrow, uncertainty, confidence," he continues.

"These songs are questions that I have been wrestling with for months, sometimes years," Caleb asserts. "They're stories I had been trying to write in the dim light of my 100-square-foot room long before they were ever brought to life in a studio. We created the album conceptually, trying to keep in mind the rules of telling a story. There must be a dramatic arc, a beginning, a middle and an end. So in that way, every song is a piece of the equation. The front half of the album is a bit more lighthearted and fun, and then the back half gets a bit heavier. And the last third, starting with 'Won't Give Up,' is very important to us."

Perhaps the most startling aspect of When I Was Younger is the band's forthrightness in addressing some deeply personal, emotionally raw issues, most notably the accidental death of Caleb and Will's 5-year-old adoptive sister Maria Sue in 2008. That tragedy is addressed on several of the album's songs, including "Keep On Keeping On" and "Won't Give Up," underlining the songs' recurring themes of faith and family.

"It has been a difficult thing to do, sharing your family tragedy when telling your story or singing your songs," Caleb states. "But I think that it's important to tell. Everyone has a story of pain, of heartbreak, of a letdown or failure, and that is a thread that ties us all together—the ones on stage and the ones in the crowd. We were dealt a painful hand, but it's what has bound us together so tightly. We want to create honest art, and this is the most important thing that has happened in our lives, so it would be a hard thing to leave out of our story."

That heart-on-sleeve honesty is just one of the qualities that make Colony House a special band, and make When I Was Younger such a remarkable musical statement.

"We believe that we have a story to tell—a story of hope and perseverance—and that's what we want to leave people with," Caleb concludes. "We are not in the business of writing tragedies. We have experienced tragedy, but we've also seen hope triumph. Our faith is woven throughout everything we do musically, just as it's woven into the foundation of our lives."
Venue Information:
Larimer Lounge
2721 Larimer St.
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.larimerlounge.com/