The Blasters, Supersuckers, Wayne "The Train" Hancock

Channel 93.3 Presents

The Blasters

Supersuckers

Wayne "The Train" Hancock

MC Clownvis Presley

Saturday, 7/13

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$25 - $27

This event is 21 and over

All sales are final. Review your order carefully, there are no refunds for any reason. Tickets are non-transferable. No tickets are mailed to you, your name will be on the will call list night of show. Night of show (1) bring a valid government issued ID and (2) print your confirmation e-mail and bring with you night of show.

The Blasters
The Blasters
Formed 1979 in Downey, CA, United States.

Phil Alvin (vocals, harmonica, guitar), John Bazz (bass), Bill Bateman (drums, 1979-93, 2008-present), Dave Alvin (guitar, 1979-86), Lee Allen (saxophone, 1981-94), Gene Taylor (keyboards, 1981-85), Steve Berlin (saxophone, 1981-84), Michael Mann [aka Hollywood Fats] (guitar, 1986), Billy Zoom (guitar, 1986), Greg "Smokey" Hormel (guitar, 1987-93), James Intveld (guitar, 1993-95), Dave Carroll (drums, 1993-94), Jerry Angel (drums, 1996-2008), Keith Wyatt (guitar, 1996-present).

The Blasters' self-described "American Music" was a blend of blues music, rockabilly, early rock and roll, punk rock, mountain music, and rhythm and blues. They still have a devoted fan base and have received largely positive critical reviews, but have earned only limited mainstream success. Critic Mark Deming wrote of them, "the Blasters displayed a wide-ranging musical diversity [and] were a supremely tight and tasteful band with enough fire, smarts, and passion for two or three groups."
Supersuckers
Supersuckers
“You’ve heard our name, you’ve seen our records, our t-shirts and our stickers. We’re probably the favorite band of someone you know and yet maybe we’re still a mystery to you. Well my friend, that’s okay, you’re at the right place to get to know the greatest rock-n-roll band in the world, The Supersuckers.

And the next time you see the ‘Supersuckers’ name, whether it’s in the record store, online somewhere, or on the marquee at your local rock club, know that there’s some quality, honest, ass-kicking, hard working individuals behind it all trying to make your life a little better through the “Evil Powers Of Rock-n-Roll” (and the occasional detour into the country music, of course) and we’d love nothing better than to have you there with us as! Just remember to wear clean underwear, ‘cuz we’re gonna rock the pants right off of you!”

– Eddie Spaghetti, The Supersuckers
Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne Hancock has been called "the master of hillbilly swing," a "roots Renaissance man," a "country singer's country singer" and "Hank Williams meets Gershwin." But the phrase most frequently echoed throughout his career is "Wayne Hancock is the real deal." Joe Ely said it, Hank Williams III said it, Bobby Koefer from the Texas Playboys said it, as have countless music fans and writers when referring to Hancock's authentic and original blend of honky tonk, western swing, blues and big band that he calls "juke joint swing!"

Authenticity and sincerity have been the cornerstones of Hancock's writing and music since the start of his career. His refusal to compromise his vision and sell out his music has earned him a fiercely loyal underground following. Hancock's vision, as he puts it, is "to bring people together and make them feel good about music. It's a spiritual thing and without spirituality, you've got nothin'. There ain't much on the radio that strikes me as being original or from the heart, most of it's from the pocketbook and it shows."

Wayne is proud of his rural roots and culture and has thoroughly absorbed the spirit of country music's forefathers such as Ernest Tubb, Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers. Never a mere imitator, the cutting-edge style that emerges is every bit his own. He breathes youth and driving energy into traditional country forms and adds a dash of big band horns, boogie woogie piano, scorching rockabilly beats, heavenly Hawaiian steel licks and some wigged-out hillbilly jazz guitar.

Hancock figures he started writing songs around the age of twelve, and he did a lot of travelling around Texas, playing juke joints and belting out his originals for anyone who'd listen. At 18, he won the "Wrangler Country Showdown" but couldn't claim the prize because he'd already enrolled in the Marines. After a six-year hitch with Uncle Sam, he moved to Austin, where he reacquainted himself with music and won a role in the 1994 theatrical production of Chippy. He performed alongside Terry Allen, Butch Hancock, Joe Ely and Robert Earl Keen and Rolling Stone proclaimed, "The nasal honky-tonk of newcomer Wayne Hancock practically steals the show."

In 1995 Wayne debuted with Thunderstorms and Neon Signs, a remarkable CD produced by steel guitar legend Lloyd Maines (Joe Ely, Wilco and Richard Buckner). The release was met with critical acclaim. Newsweek called it "the most promising debut of the season." Two-hundred-fifty dates throughout the country, including brilliant performances on Austin City Limits and NPR's Prairie Home Companion, led to well over 22,000 copies sold of his debut release on a tiny independent Texas label.

In 1997, Wayne signed with ARK 21, an eclectic and well-anchored label owned by former Police manager Miles Copeland. Miles and his staff were impressed with Wayne's genuine ability for writing and performing and have dubbed him "arguably the hardest-working man in show business" for his willingness to tour solidly and his insistence on efficiency and untainted live energy in the studio. That's What Daddy Wants, Hancock's sophomore release, was recorded in a startling three days. A brilliant example of his Texas swing and juke joint rockabilly, the album was even a staple on the space shuttle Columbia, the bugle call of its title track used to wake the astronauts. After That's What Daddy Wants generated even more critical success than the first release, ARK 21 decided to reissue Thunderstorms and Neon Signs on their label.

The past several years have been a time of personal evolution and growth in Wayne's life. He was self-managed since the beginning of 1998 and later that year he lost his father to cancer.He has still been gigging solidly throughout the country and has been doing his own driving, tour managing and taking care of business in exactly his own way.
Venue Information:
Larimer Lounge
2721 Larimer St.
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.larimerlounge.com/